Atlanta Airport Ridehailing Pilot

Atlanta Airport Ridehailing Pilot

Atlanta, GA

A focus was placed on shared rides to test the viability of shuttle services from neighborhoods south of the airport with high concentrations of employees to the airport.

The Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (HJAIA) is the busiest airport in the country and a major employer. UrbanTrans has been working with the airport and helped develop, launch, and now manage AERO, a transportation management program designed to help over 63,000 airport employees get to and from work.

While the airport is well served by transit, many current and potential employees still have trouble getting to jobs at the airport. This is particularly true for commuters who live south of the airport, many of whom are low-wage earners and rely on infrequent and indirect bus service. UrbanTrans worked with the airport to develop and implement the first employee ridehailing commute program at an airport.

This pilot program provided airport employees without transit access a viable commute alternative using UberPool. This service matches riders heading in the same direction, and the program subsidized those rides to and from the airport. A focus was placed on shared rides to test the viability of shuttle services from neighborhoods south of the airport with high concentrations of employees to the airport.

To develop this pilot program, UrbanTrans reviewed applicable best practices and coordinated with airport staff to identify desired outcomes and measures of success. Implementation of the pilot required:

  • Identification of target neighborhoods
  • The selection of a service provider
  • Identification of pick-up and drop-off locations
  • Creation of eligibility requirements
  • Determination of subsidy values and fare payment
  • Marketing efforts to raise awareness.

In addition, UrbanTrans developed a process through which program utilization and costs were tracked.

Pilot participants were selected based on an annual survey of airport employee commuting patterns administered by AERO. Survey data showed that commuters living south of the airport had very long transit trips, an average of 49 minutes one way, and often paid significant parking fees.

Based on survey data and MARTA service, a target area was established to focus on employees who lived up to 10 miles south of the airport. Employees living less than five from the airport received a $5 subsidy and those living 5 to 10 miles from the airport received a $10 subsidy. The subsidy amounts were selected to make the cost of taking UberPool to and from work approximately equal to the cost of riding transit.

The project was implemented by AERO staff in coordination with Commutifi, a technology company that provided a software solution to invite participants, verify eligibility, and distribute UberPool subsidies.

The AERO program had contact information for approximately 350 employees who lived within the target boundaries of the pilot and utilized that information for marketing. Employees were required to select the UberPool option when requesting their Uber ride and be dropped off or picked up within 0.25 miles of Georgia International Convention Center, where they could catch the free SkyTrain to their worksite at the airport.

Results:

The pilot provided 508 rides at a total subsidy of $3,900 to employees living south of the airport. In a post-pilot survey, program participants reported that the pilot was successful in reducing commute times and commute costs. Survey respondents reported time savings of 25 minutes per day and cost savings of $12 per day.

The pilot showed that employees were willing to use a shared service and pay a cost similar to riding transit to get to and from the airport, indicating a demand for scheduled shuttle service. Shuttles could increase the number of employees who can access jobs at the airport, which has the potential to increase employee retention and facilitate recruitment.

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FHWA Mobility on Demand Business Model Analysis

FHWA Mobility on Demand Business Model Analysis

Washington D.C.
The changing nature of the MOD marketplace has made it difficult for planning agencies to integrate MOD solutions into their communities and adequately mitigate for the frequent changes in MOD business models.

UrbanTrans is part of a team that is developing guidance to help transportation planners and agencies better integrate mobility on demand (MOD) business models into their planning processes. The changing nature of the MOD marketplace has made it difficult for planning agencies to integrate MOD solutions into their communities and adequately mitigate for the frequent changes in MOD business models.

The project began with an assessment of existing MOD business models. The assessment provides planners with a better understanding of the various services in the MOD ecosystem and what drives business decisions. When planners have a better understanding of business models, they are better able to predict how those models may change, what motivates MOD companies to work with communities, and how regulatory models may impact service provision. The project team then built a multi-step planning template to walk users through the selection of MOD services. The template includes a community mobility needs assessment to identify needs and match those needs to appropriate MOD business models. Planners are then walked through a planning exercise scenario to consider how internal and external factors may impact the delivery of MOD services. Examples include a MOD company ceasing service, moving from a business-to-government model to a business-to-consumer model, and loss of access to technology vendors that distribute key transportation information. The scenario planning template includes sample mitigations that can be used to address identified factors that may affect service delivery.

The final tool will help planners understand what MOD solutions are best for their community, what risks may occur when adopting solutions, and what mitigations can be taken (including not pursuing MOD solutions) to address potential risks.

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Perimeter Case Study

Transforming Commuting in one of Atlanta's Thriving Business Hubs

Case Study

Central Perimeter is home to one of Atlanta’s densest employment areas in the region, with more than 130,000 employees and 3,000+ companies representing a mix of Fortune 500 companies, large to small enterprises, and service industry businesses across four square miles. An advocate for infrastructure and transportation, the Perimeter Community Improvement Districts hired UrbanTrans to implement transportation solutions that improve access and mobility and reduce congestion within the commercial district.

Atlanta, Georgia
Ongoing Project
2015 – Present
TDM, First/Last Mile

Perimeter sits at the confluence of two major highways, and its primary intersection sees over 400,000 cars each day. As the area continues to gain popularity among leading companies in Atlanta due to its convenient location and reasonable office rent prices, Perimeter’s influx in commuters is pushing its infrastructure past its limits—resulting in high volumes of traffic and significant commute times. However, the area boasts three heavy rail stations and a commuter bus service. UrbanTrans leverages these key amenities and works directly with properties, employers, and employees to decrease drive-alone commutes and increase transit ridership, carpools, telework, and active transportation among employees throughout the district.

UrbanTrans leverages a unique two-pronged approach to drive results and redefine what it means to get to work in Perimeter: deep-dive programming for major employers and scalable solutions for area businesses. UrbanTrans works with large properties and employers to impact thousands of commuters through programming, urban planning, and policymaking. To serve the rest of the market, UrbanTrans offers a digital menu of services and resources, so employers of all sizes can benefit from the same advising and support given to larger enterprises.
Results
0 K
Commuters served at partner employers or properties
0 M
(and counting) fewer drive alone commute miles annually
0 +
discounted transit passes sold per month

City and County of Denver TDM Regulations

City and County of Denver TDM Regulations

Denver, Colorado
The project included significant public outreach that targeted developers, financiers, elected officials, neighborhood groups, transportation-related non-profits, regional governments, and shared-mobility service providers.

UrbanTrans is helping lead the development of a Transportation Demand Management (TDM) plan for the City and County of Denver. The city has seen significant growth in recent years that has resulted in increased congestion and parking demand. Simultaneously, the region and city have made large investments in transit infrastructure while suffering decreases in transit use.

The city hired UrbanTrans and its project partners David Evans and Associates and Fox Tuttle Hernandez to develop TDM policies to decrease vehicle trips and parking demand associated with new development and encourage the use of transit, walking, and biking. The planning effort included a review of citywide plans, policies of peer governments, and applicable academic research.

The project included significant public outreach that targeted developers, financiers, elected officials, neighborhood groups, transportation-related non-profits, regional governments, and shared-mobility service providers. Outreach included one-on-one meetings, focus groups, public meetings, a webinar, and an online survey.

The research and community feedback were used to develop three draft recommendations that were refined through additional stakeholder input leading to a final preferred option. The preferred option involves a tiered TDM requirement that adjusts based on development size, land use, location, and proximity to transit. An online tool will be developed that will provide developers with an interactive list of TDM strategies based on the specific characteristics of their development.

The final recommendations include specific actions that the city needs to take to implement the new regulations including staffing requirements, updates to internal tools to assure compliance, and incentives that should be provided to offset TDM program costs for developers and subsequent landowners.

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California Institute of Technology (Caltech) Employee Mobility Plan

California Institute of Technology (Caltech) Employee Mobility Plan

Pasadena, California
Recommendations included a parking pricing plan; increased and simplified vanpool and transit subsidies; a last-mile service; and TDM branding and messaging among other strategies.

UrbanTrans developed an Employee Mobility Plan for Caltech that identified actions to enhance mobility for its 4,290 employees through an effective transportation demand management (TDM) program. This plan was an update to the institute’s 1989 plan that was required to comply with the City of Pasadena’s TDM ordinance. The plan proposed new and enhanced strategies to further reduce single occupancy vehicle trips to campus, helping to ensure that Caltech continues to meet the average vehicle ridership (AVR) goal set by the City.

TDM strategy recommendations were developed based on a thorough analysis of existing TDM strategies and land use and transportation conditions, feedback obtained during the campus focus groups, analysis of SCAQMD employee commute survey data, campus site visits, and a review of best practices and benchmarks. Recommendations included:
A parking pricing plan

  • Increased and simplified vanpool and transit subsidies
  • A last-mile service
  • TDM branding and messaging among other strategies.
Results:

Impacts associated with the enhanced TDM programs were modeled using TRIMMS and were estimated to reduce the number of single occupancy vehicle trips to and from campus by between 11% and 23% and increase AVR from 1.6 to between 2.0 and 2.5. UrbanTrans also developed a Year One TDM Program to accompany the plan that outlined actions to commence delivery of the recommended TDM strategies in the first year of implementation.

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Downtown Westminster TDM Plan

Downtown Westminster TDM Plan

Westminster, Colorado
TDM strategy recommendations included parking management strategies, infrastructure investments, a transit pass program, a bike share program, educational efforts, and incentives.

UrbanTrans developed a Transportation Demand Management (TDM) plan for downtown Westminster to facilitate the city’s goals to encourage density, minimize parking demand, and promote an active environment, supportive of walking, biking, and transit use, at the 105-acre redevelopment site of a former mall. To develop the plan, UrbanTrans undertook an inventory of existing and planned transportation infrastructure and services, collected anticipated resident and employee demographics, and evaluated projected vehicle trip generation. TDM strategy recommendations included parking management strategies, infrastructure investments, a transit pass program, a bike share program, educational efforts, and incentives.

To help assure successful implementation of plan recommendations, UrbanTrans developed an implementation timeline based on the completion of development milestones. Additionally, the plan included:

  • Estimates of staffing and funds needed to implement the recommended strategies
  • Potential funding sources
  • Estimates of the likely impacts implementation will have on travel behavior and parking demand.
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Club Ride Commuter Services

Club Ride Commuter Services

Las Vegas, Nevada
An annual transportation coordinator survey is being conducted with the goal of gaining insights into how transportation coordinators view the program, what could be done to help them promote Club Ride and alternative transportation modes and any additional feedback they have that could influence the program moving forward.
UrbanTrans has been performing annual program evaluation and support activities for the Regional Transportation Commission of Southern Nevada’s commuter services program, which serves all of Clark County. Program evaluation includes conducting and analyzing an annual commuter survey, aimed at identifying commute trends, program satisfaction, program impacts and opportunities to enhance the overall program and employer specific offerings. An annual transportation coordinator survey is being conducted with the goal of gaining insights into how transportation coordinators view the program, what could be done to help them promote Club Ride and alternative transportation modes as well as any additional feedback that could influence the program moving forward. Support activities have also included employer specific surveys conducted to develop targeted recommendations for a selection of engaged employers. Additional projects included an analysis of Club Ride’s rewards and incentive programs, a segmented email campaign developed to reactivate members who had become inactive and a redesign and update of Club Ride’s toolkit for employee transportation coordinators and related marketing materials.
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Monterey Active Transportation/Demand Management Plan

Monterey Active Transportation / Demand Management Plan

Monterey, California
Following a thorough existing conditions analysis, including GIS mapping of TDM supportive infrastructure, UrbanTrans developed a set of strategies tailored to the three distinct audiences.
UrbanTrans has been assisting the City of Monterey with development of an Active Transportation/Demand Management (AT/TDM )plan. A popular tourist destination that is also host to several academic and military institutions, Monterey was looking for ways to decrease single occupant vehicle travel and reduce peak period and seasonal congestion by developing targeted strategies aimed at three target audiences: in-commuting workers, students and visitors. Following a thorough existing conditions analysis, including GIS mapping of TDM supportive infrastructure, UrbanTrans developed a set of strategies tailored to the three distinct audiences. Because a transportation management association was deemed infeasible, UrbanTrans staff contributed to the development of a user-friendly online tool employers can use to determine which strategies are best suited for the type, size, and location of their organizations as well as their business priorities.
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US 36 TDM Construction Mitigation Plan

US 36 TDM Construction Mitigation Plan

US-36 Corridor, Colorado
Program evaluation showed that transit ridership by employees working near park and rides increased by 67% as a result of program efforts. Individuals who participated in other subsidy programs decreased their commute drive alone rate by 34%. Overall, vehicle travel was reduced by more than 120,000 vehicle trips and 3 million VMT per year.

The US 36, which connects Denver to Boulder, went through a transformation that added managed lanes, bus rapid transit, bus-on-shoulder service and a regional bike path to the corridor.

UrbanTrans worked with 36 Commuting Solutions, a Transportation Demand Management (TDM) provider along the corridor, to develop a TDM construction mitigation plan to encourage travelers to choose sustainable travel modes during construction and prime the market to assure high utilization of planned services and infrastructure and provide long-term congestion relief. Development of the plan involved coordination with area employers, multiple government agencies and regional TDM implementers.

The plan’s recommendations include unique subsidies to encourage travel behavior change, a robust marketing plan, the creation of multiple districts where employees will be eligible for free transit passes, new tools to inform commuters of their travel options and methods for measuring the impact of the program on travel behavior.

Results:

Program evaluation showed that transit ridership by employees working near park and rides increased by 67% as a result of program efforts. Individuals who participated in other subsidy programs decreased their commute drive alone rate by 34%. Overall, vehicle travel was reduced by more than 120,000 vehicle trips and 3 million VMT per year.

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Destination Medical Center Transportation Study and TMA Formation

Destination Medical Center Transportation Study and TMA Formation

Rochester, Minnesota
UrbanTrans developed recommendations regarding what TDM strategies should be provided and the organizational structure through which those strategies should be delivered.

UrbanTrans was part of a consulting team that worked with the city of Rochester to study investments in transit, active transportation, Transportation Demand Management (TDM), and parking management as part of a significant planning and economic development effort aimed at accommodating a two-fold increase in its downtown employment over a 20-year period.

Results:

UrbanTrans developed recommendations regarding what TDM strategies should be provided and the organizational structure through which those strategies should be delivered. UrbanTrans also assisted the city with the development of policies to encourage new developments to fund and implement TDM strategies that reduce parking demand and vehicle travel.

Simultaneous to our TDM planning work, UrbanTrans has helped the city plan and implement a pilot TDM program for city staff and subsequently launched a transportation management association to expand that program to other employers and employees within the city. Current efforts include surveying employees, identifying applicable TDM strategies, and developing and implementing marketing and educational efforts to encourage travel behavior change.

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